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SDS Seminar Series: Dr. Noirrit Chandra (Friday 4/16/21, 2pm)
Friday, April 16, 2021, 02:00pm - 03:00pm

The Spring 2021 SDS Seminar Series continues on Friday, April 16 from 2:00 p.m. to 3:00 p.m. via Zoom with Dr. Noirrit Chandra (Postdoctoral Fellow at the Department of Statistics and Data Sciences in the College of Natural Sciences at The University of Texas at Austin).

Please contact stat.admin@austin.utexas.edu for the Zoom link.

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Title"Accelerating Clinical Trials with Real World Data in a Bayesian Non-parametric Approach"

Abstract: Randomized clinical trials (RCT) are the gold standard for approvals by regulatory agencies. But clinical trials are increasingly time consuming, expensive, and laborious with a multitude of bottlenecks involving volunteer recruitment, patient truancy, and adverse events.  An alternative that fast tracks clinical trials without compromising quality of scientific results is desirable to more rapidly bring therapies to patients. Additional benefits are significant cost savings, reduced cycle times, and quicker availability of cures. Such approaches could arise from the use of Big data, which has ushered in big-scale digitization of data. The availability of electronic health records (EHR) has opened opportunities for digital healthcare innovations involving EHR and other readily available real world data. In this project we use EHR data to construct synthetic control arms for single arm trials, and synthetic treatment arms to design a study based on entirely real world data only. We propose a novel non-parametric Bayesian method where we find equivalent population classes from the EHR and the treatment arm and also test for the treatment effects. We show equivalence of the two classes by standard supervised classification algorithms. The motivating applications involve a collaboration with neuro-oncologists, designing trials for glioblastoma.